Publications

2017
He L, Pagneux Q, Larroulet I, Serrano AY, Pesquera A, Zurutuza A, Mandler D, Boukherroub R, Szunerits S. Label-free femtomolar cancer biomarker detection in human serum using graphene-coated surface plasmon resonance chips. Biosens. Bioelectron.Biosensors & Bioelectronics. 2017;89 (Part_1) :606 - 611.Abstract
Sensitive and selective detection of cancer biomarkers is vital for the successful diagnosis of early stage cancer and follow-up treatment. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) in combination with different amplification strategies is one of the anal. approaches allowing the screening of protein biomarkers in serum. Here we describe the development of a point-of-care sensor for the detection of folic acid protein (FAP) using graphene-based SPR chips. The exceptional properties of CVD graphene were exploited to construct a highly sensitive and selective SPR chip for folate biomarker sensing in serum. The specific recognition of FAP is based on the interaction between folic acid receptors integrated through π-stacking on the graphene coated SPR chip and the FAP analyte in serum. A simple post-adsorption of human serum:bovine serum albumin (HS:BSA) mixts. onto the folic acid modified sensor resulted in a highly anti-fouling interface, while keeping the sensing capabilities for folate biomarkers. This sensor allowed femtomolar (fM) detection of FAP, a detection limit well adapted and promising for quant. clin. anal. [on SciFinder(R)]
2016
Ling H, Ding G, Mandler D, Lee PS, Xu J, Lu X. Facile preparation of aqueous suspensions of WO3/sulfonated PEDOT hybrid nanoparticles for electrochromic applications. CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS. 2016;52 (60) :9379-9382.
Lu Q, Liu C, Wang N, Magdassi S, Mandler D, Long Y. Periodic micro-patterned VO2 thermochromic films by mesh printing. JOURNAL OF MATERIALS CHEMISTRY C. 2016;4 (36) :8385-8391.
Hitrik M, Pisman Y, Wittstock G, Mandler D. Speciation of nanoscale objects by nanoparticle imprinted matrices. NANOSCALE. 2016;8 (29) :13934-13943.
Buffa A, Erel Y, Mandler D. Carbon Nanotube Based Flow-Through Electrochemical Cell for Electroanalysis. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. 2016;88 (22) :11007-11015.
He L, Wang Q, Mandler D, Li M, Boukherroub R, Szunerits S. Detection of folic acid protein in human serum using reduced graphene oxide electrodes modified by folic-acid. BIOSENSORS & BIOELECTRONICS. 2016;75 :389-395.
Metoki N, Mandler D, Eliaz N. Effect of Decorating Titanium with Different Self-Assembled Monolayers on the Electrodeposition of Calcium Phosphate. CRYSTAL GROWTH & DESIGN. 2016;16 (5) :2756-2764.
Fedorov RG, Mandler D. Effect of Self-Assembled Monolayers on the Locally Electrodeposited Silver Thin Layers. JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY C. 2016;120 (29) :15608-15617.
Metoki N, Sadman K, Shull K, Eliaz N, Mandler D. Electro-Assisted Deposition of Calcium Phosphate on Self-Assembled Monolayers. ELECTROCHIMICA ACTA. 2016;206 :400-408.
Geuli O, Metoki N, Eliaz N, Mandler D. Electrochemically Driven Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles Coating of Medical Implants. ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS. 2016;26 (44) :8003-8010.
Bera RK, Mhaisalkar SG, Mandler D, Magdassi S. Formation and performance of highly absorbing solar thermal coating based on carbon nanotubes and boehmite. ENERGY CONVERSION AND MANAGEMENT. 2016;120 :287-293.
Thomas MB, Metoki N, Mandler D, Eliaz N. In Situ Potentiostatic Deposition of Calcium Phosphate with Gentamicin-Loaded Chitosan Nanoparticles on Titanium Alloy Surfaces. ELECTROCHIMICA ACTA. 2016;222 :355-360.
Shahar T, Tal N, Mandler D. Molecularly imprinted polymer particles: Formation, characterization and application. COLLOIDS AND SURFACES A-PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND ENGINEERING ASPECTS. 2016;495 :11-19.
Witt J, Mandler D, Wittstock G. Nanoparticle-Imprinted Matrices as Sensing Layers for Size-Selective Recognition of Silver Nanoparticles. CHEMELECTROCHEM. 2016;3 (12) :2116-2124.
Turyan I, Khatwani N, Sosic Z, Jayawickreme S, Mandler D. A novel approach for oxidation analysis of therapeutic proteins. ANALYTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY. 2016;494 :108-113.
Fedorov RG, Mandler D. Effect of Self-Assembled Monolayers on the Locally Electrodeposited Silver Thin Layers. J. Phys. Chem. CJournal of Physical Chemistry C. 2016;120 (29) :15608 - 15617.Abstract
The localized electrodeposition of Ag on Au coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by scanning electrochem. microscopy (SECM) is reported. The SAMs were ω-functionalized alkanethiols X-(CH2)2SH, X = OH, NH2, CO2H, SO3H, as well as 4-mercaptobenzoic acid. The SAMs were characterized by XPS and cycling voltammetry (CV). The anodic dissoln. of a Ag microelectrode, which was held within a few microns from the Au surface, formed a well-controlled flux of Ag+. Deposition of Ag nanostructures was driven by the electrochem. redn. of the Ag+ on the Au surface. The effect of the functional group on the Ag local deposition was studied and compared with bulk deposition on the same SAMs. For bulk deposition, the interaction between Ag+ ions and the functional group of the alkanethiols slowed the kinetics of Ag deposition, shifting the deposition to potential that is more neg. and caused the formation of large, well-faceted Ag crystals. A clear correlation between the potential shift value and the morphol. of deposited Ag was obsd. The local deposition of Ag showed distinct difference compared to bulk deposition. A continuous and homogeneous Ag film was formed locally below the Ag microelectrode in the presence of a 3-mercaptopropionic acid monolayer. This was obsd. when a 120 s delay between the electrogeneration of the Ag ions and the application of a neg. potential to the Au surface was applied. Also, the potential applied to the Au surface also affected deposition. The deposited Ag was recollected by the Ag microelectrode by stripping the Ag from the Au surface while holding the microelectrode in the same position. This enabled calcg. the thickness of the Ag film deposited on the Au coated with 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Addnl. expts. clearly indicated that the mechanism of deposition involved complexation of Ag ions by the SAM and their local redn., which commenced prior to applying a neg. potential to the Au surface. [on SciFinder(R)]
Buffa A, Erel Y, Mandler D. Carbon Nanotube Based Flow-Through Electrochemical Cell for Electroanalysis. Anal. Chem. (Washington, DC, U. S.)Analytical Chemistry (Washington, DC, United States). 2016;88 (22) :11007 - 11015.Abstract
A flow-through electrode made of a C nanotubes (CNT) film deposited on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane was assembled and employed for the detn. of low concn. of Cu as a model system by linear sweep anodic stripping voltammetry (LSASV). CNT films with areal mass ranging from 0.12 to 0.72 mg cm-2 were characterized by measurement of sheet resistance, H2O permeation flux and capacitance. Also, CNT with two different sizes and PTFE membrane with two different pore diams. (0.45 and 5.0 μm) were evaluated during the optimization of the electrode. Thick layers made of small CNT exhibited the lowest sheet resistance and the greatest anal. response, whereas thin layers of large CNT had the lowest capacitance and the highest permeation flux. Electrodes made of 0.12 mg cm-2 of large CNT deposited on 5.0 μm PTFE enabled sufficiently high mass transfer and collection efficiency for detecting 64 ppt of Cu(II) within 5 min of deposition and 4.0 mL min-1 flow rate. The anal. response was linear over 4 orders of magnitude (10-9 to 10-5 M) of Cu(II). The excellent performance of the flow-through CNT membrane integrated in a flow cell makes it an appealing approach not only for electroanal., but also for the electrochem. treatment of waters, such as the removal of low concns. of heavy metals and orgs. [on SciFinder(R)]
Metoki N, Mandler D, Eliaz N. Effect of Decorating Titanium with Different Self-Assembled Monolayers on the Electrodeposition of Calcium Phosphate. Cryst. Growth Des.Crystal Growth & Design. 2016;16 (5) :2756 - 2764.Abstract
Calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics are used in orthopedics and dentistry due to their excellent osseointegration and biocompatibility. The electrodeposition of CaP on titanium alloy covered with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was studied with respect to the influence of chain length, end-group charge, and anchoring group. SAMs with end-groups similar to the functional groups on the side chains of collagen were selected. This study is divided to three parts: (1) studying the effects of SAMs on the titanium substrate, (2) studying the process of nucleation and growth of the CaP on specific SAMs, and (3) characterizing the CaP coatings using various surface anal. techniques. It was concluded that the nucleation and growth behavior of CaP changed in the presence of the SAMs. Different surface energies and crystallog. phases were assocd. with this change. Although the nucleation remained progressive, the growth changed from three-dimensional on bare surfaces to two-dimensional on SAMs-covered surfaces. Moreover, the deposition kinetics was slower on SAMs-covered surfaces, with phases contg. a higher Ca/P ratio. Examn. of the coating revealed that different SAMs lead to different surface morphologies of the coating while maintaining its degree of crystallinity. Yet, the phase content changes from hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate (HAp + OCP) on the bare electrode to OCP only on the SAMs-covered electrode. These changes may have a substantial effect on the in vivo behavior by changing the coating's soly. and surface morphol., thus affecting cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation processes. [on SciFinder(R)]
Metoki N, Sadman K, Shull K, Eliaz N, Mandler D. Electro-Assisted Deposition of Calcium Phosphate on Self-Assembled Monolayers. Electrochim. ActaElectrochimica Acta. 2016;206 :400 - 408.Abstract
Ca phosphate (CaP) ceramics were used in orthopedics and dentistry due to their excellent biocompatibility and osseointegration. Here, the electro-assisted deposition of CaP on two different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), 2-mercaptoacetic acid (MAA) and 2-mercaptoethanol (ME), was studied both at short (up to 3 min) and long (2 h) deposition periods on well-defined evapd. Au surfaces. The end group of the monolayer has a major effect on the growth of the CaP coating. The deposition was slower and less elec. efficient on MAA SAM, but surface cracking was essentially eliminated due to redn. of the crystallog. mismatch. The carboxylic acid may facilitate CaP growth by attracting Ca2+ ions to the surface, which could explain the higher amt. of side reactions occurring at the beginning of the deposition. [on SciFinder(R)]
Geuli O, Metoki N, Eliaz N, Mandler D. Electrochemically Driven Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles Coating of Medical Implants. Adv. Funct. Mater.Advanced Functional Materials. 2016 :Ahead of Print.Abstract
Calcium phosphates are of great interest for biomedical applications such as bone tissue engineering, bone fillers, drug and gene delivery, and orthopedic and dental implant coating. Here, the first electrochem. driven coating of medical implants using hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles (NPs) as building blocks is reported. This uncommon combination offers a simple, straightforward, and economic process with well controllable, pure, single-phase HAp. Cryst., pure HAp NPs are formed by pptn. reaction. The HAp NPs are dispersed by either citrate or poly(acrylic acid) to form pH sensitive dispersion. Controllable and homogeneous coating of medical implants is accomplished by altering the pH on the surface upon applying either a const. potential or current. The process involves protonation of the carboxylic acid moieties, which causes the irreversible aggregation of the HAp NPs due to diminishing the repulsive forces between the particles. Deposition is further demonstrated on a com. dental implant. Moreover, the adhesion of the coating satisfies FDA and international std. requirements. A porous interconnected network of bone-like HAp layer is formed during soaking in a simulated body fluid for 30 d and is similar to bone generation, and it therefore holds promise for further in vivo testing. [on SciFinder(R)]

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