Don't stand so close to me: A behavioral and ERP study of preferred interpersonal distance

Citation:

A., Perry, Rubinsten Orly., Peled Leehe., and Shamay-Tsoory S.G. “Don't stand so close to me: A behavioral and ERP study of preferred interpersonal distance.” NeuroImage 83 (2013): 761 - 769.

Abstract:

The space between people, or interpersonal distance, creates and defines the dynamics of social interactions. Given that invasion of one's interpersonal space may trigger threat and anxiety, a critical question is if high vulnerability to social anxiety (SA) is associated with avoidance and attentional biases when anticipating invasion to one's interpersonal space. Therefore, the current study sought to examine the behavioral mechanisms, time course and neural correlates underlying the threat of interpersonal distance invasion with a focus on different SA levels, using both a behavioral and an ERP experiment. Preferred interpersonal distance was assessed using a paradigm that involves responding to different virtual protagonists (friend or stranger) approaching the participant by indicating where one would like the protagonist to stop. In addition, participants' level of social anxiety was measured. The behavioral experiment indicated that levels of SA predicted one's preferred interp

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 12/19/2017