Dr. Inbal Arnon

Dr. Inbal Arnon

Dr. Inbal Arnon

Research Interests:

The acquisition, processing and representation of language, focusing on two fundamental questions: what does it mean to know language and how is this knowledge acquired? The learning mechanisms used by children and adults in learning first and second languages; the mechanisms involved in language processing; and the various factors - cognitive and environmental - that influence children's linguistic development. My research lies at the intersection of Linguistics, Psychology and Cognitive Science - it combines theoretical insights from the three fields, and applies experimental methods from the social sciences to the study of language. We draw on a variety of experimental methodologies (among them naturalistic child and adult corpus studies, experiments with children and adults, and artificial language learning), and look at a range of languages (mostly English, Hebrew and Arabic) and populations (child learners, adult native-speakers, and L2 learners.

Community Outreach:

Founder of the new Living Lab at the Bloomfield Children’s Science Museum in Jerusalem. The Living Lab aims to educate the public about child development by immersing museum visitors in the process of scientific discovery. The lab aims to promote developmental research in Israel; expose parents and children to new findings on child development; and let visitors and educators engage with scientists studying child development. The lab is based on the Living Lab model (http://www.livinglab.org), successfully implemented in over 40 museums around the world. This is the first Living Lab in Israel.

Publications:

Edited Books

  • Arnon, I., Casillas, M., Estigabarria, B., & Kurumada, C. (2014). Language in Interaction: Studies in Honour of Eve V. Clark. Trends in Language Acquisition Research Series, Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Arnon, I., & Clark, E. V. (2011). Experience, Variation and Generalization: Learning a First Language. Trends in Language Acquisition Research Series, Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Encyclopedia Entries

  • Arnon, I. (2014). Acquisition of Grammatical Gender. Encyclopedia of Language Development, SAGE publications (259-260). 
  • Arnon, I. (2014). Distributional Knowledge and Language Learning. Encyclopedia of Language Development, SAGE publications (161-163). 
  • Arnon, I. & Christiansen, M. (2014). Chunk-based Language Acquisition. Encyclopedia of Language Development, SAGE publications (88-91).

Book Chapters

  • Arnon, I. (in press). The nature of child-directed speech in Hebrew: frequent frames in a morphologically rich language. The Acquisition of Hebrew (Ed. Ruth Berman), Trends in Language Acquisition Research Series, Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Kurumada, C. & Arnon, I. (2014). Language acquisition in interaction, In I. Arnon, Casillas, M., C. Kurumada, & B. Estigarribia (Eds.), Language in Interaction, Trends in Language Acquisition Research Series, Amsterdam: John Benjamins
  • Snider, N., & Arnon, I. (2012). A unified lexicon and grammar? Compositional and non-compositional phrases in the lexicon. In S. Gries & D. Divjak (Eds.) Frequency effects in language. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. 

Articles in Refereed Journals

  • Arnon, I. (2015). What can frequency effects tell us about the building blocks and mechanisms of language learning? Journal of Child Language,xx-xx 
  • Arnon, I. & Cohen Priva, U. (2014). Time and again: the changing effect of word and multiword frequency on phonetic duration, Mental Lexicon, 9, 377-400 Costa, A., Foucart, A., Arnon, I., Aparici, M., & Apesteguia, J. (2014). “Piensa” twice: On the foreign language effect in decision making, Cognition, 130, 236-254 
  • Arnon, I. & Cohen Priva, U. (2013). More than words: the effect of multi-word frequency and constituency on phonetic duration. Language and Speech, Special Issue: Parsimony and Redundancy in Models of Language, 56, 346-368.

Contact Information

Department of Psychology
Social Sciences Building, 2611
Mount Scopus, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91905
p: 02-5883405